Favorite Podcasts Hosted by Women

99percentinvisible:

Fun fact: some of the best podcasts in the world are hosted by women. 

Already listening to some. Looking forward to checking out the ones that are new to me. 

Edmonton historic downtown house to move aside while condo tower goes up

latitude53:

This historic house is a past home of the gallery.

I used to feel uncomfortable and ashamed whenever someone asked me a question I couldn’t answer, or when my ignorance was exposed in public somehow. These days, though, I’ve come to feel that there’s nothing particularly shameful about not knowing… I’ve grown old, in a word.

– Kokoro, by Natsume Soseki

smoonie:

Today, Edmonton lost some of Toti’s work to sandblasters.

That mural was 30 years old, some might say that is very young but seeing as we just celebrated the centennial of Alberta that means this mural has been around for 30% of our documented existence.

*sigh*

(via maybeedmonton)

truthfulfolk:

Tyler loves to cook. Last night he prepared a fish that he caught while ice fishing a few weeks ago.

Photos from a meal I made for Dylan months ago. 

780distro:

We found a home for our second zine machine! You can visit it at Transcend Coffee on 109 street and 87th avenue. All art is 1.50$ and we are still accepting submissions for this machine! 

(via christine-ism)

truthfulwork:

My good friend Tyler. He invents social media marketing strategies for a university in Edmonton by day and plays folk music by night. 
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D
  • Exposure: 1/60th
  • Focal Length: 75mm

truthfulwork:

My good friend Tyler. He invents social media marketing strategies for a university in Edmonton by day and plays folk music by night. 

(Source: truthfulfolk)

citiesandcitizens:

Groat Ravine.  July 2013.

Groat Road, pictured here, was built overtop of a creek, through the Groat Ravine in 1954 as a mini-freeway between the University of Alberta and Westmount Centre, Edmonton’s first shopping mall.

Due to Edmonton’s geography of being a city perched atop a wide berthed river valley, the city has many ravines, some of which were exploited for the advantage of the automobile. 

Luckily, city leaders over the decades have largely left the North Saskatchewan River Valley unaltered or have replanted indigenous flora where human development once was in the valley. 

Mill Creek, one of the largest ravines in Edmonton, on the city’s southeast was actually planned to be dried out for a quick, direct freeway from the southside to downtown.  This would’ve made 91 Street, rather than the couplet of Gateway Blvd and Calgary Trail, the main southerly entrance into Edmonton. 

Although we now have to deal with the annoying hairpin at the end of Gateway Blvd to get downtown from the southside, I’m glad to see that Edmonton chose to preserve this natural asset of ours and that we didn’t  think solely for the sake of convenience.